Sunbury & Mt. Carmel newspapers

Well, a few Inter-Library Loans arrived today. The Halifax Bicentennial, however, has not arrived yet and I am beginning to wonder if perhaps it is really non-circulating. Which would not be good, because the State Library is the only library in the state that has it, and going there right now just isn’t possible.

So, what did arrive today? Newspapers from the Sunbury Daily and Mount Carmel Item, 1931. I had decided to look up the obituary of Sarah W. Kulp in other area newspapers, since I’d only checked the local paper before and there might be something else mentioned elsewhere that I needed to know.

Well, there wasn’t much, but it was nonetheless an interesting read…especially about her brother’s involvement in Prohibition. Had not heard that before.

Sunbury Daily: Monday, February 23, 1931, page 3

Mrs. Sarah Kulp of Shamokin Dies

Mrs. Sarah Washington Detwiler Kulp, 64 years old, of Shamokin, widow of the late Congressman Monroe Henry Kulp, died suddenly Sunday at Atlantic City where she had gone to spend a few days.

Mrs. Kulp is believed to have been the only woman who ever was the president of a traction company. After her husband’s death in 1911 she took over the active management of the Shamokin-Edgewood Railway Company, now defunct, a line which served Edgewood, one of the three communities her husband had founded. The other two are Fairview and Kulpmont.

She was known throughout Northumberland County for her activities, which took up much of her time until very recently when she decided to take things easier. Her husband at his death left a considerable fortune which he had accumulated in various enterprises, which had included the building of a railroad, real estate development and the management of a lumber company left to him by his father.

The couple had no children. Mrs. Kulp is survived by her brother, former State Senator W.C. McConnell, who some years ago was prohibition administrator in Philadelphia in the early days of prohibition. Funeral arrangements have not yet been announced.

Mount Carmel Item: Monday, February 23, 1931, page 7

Mrs. Monroe H. Kulp is Dead

Word was received at Shamokin of the death of Mrs. Sarah W. D. Kulp, 64, widow of Congressman Monroe Henry Kulp and head of the Shamokin-Edgewood Trolley Company for a number of years. She died yesterday at Atlantic City where she was spending several days.

The late Congressman was one of the best known men this county ever knew. He was one of the founders of Kulpmont and the Episcopal church there was named as memorial to him.

______________________________________________________________________

As a note: For some reason, both articles say that she was 64, but actually she was 68, as most records say she was born in March of 1862.

From History of Houses to the Lives of their Builders

This article is written for the 53rd Edition of Carnival of Genealogy. (See previous post.)

When I learned that this edition was the type where you could write about basically anything family history, and especially because this is my first time writing for COG, I was a little overwhelmed by all the possibilities. Where to start?

But, as I went back and read earlier editions of the Carnival of Genealogy, I noticed that one edition was dedicated to the subject of houses in historical research; where our ancestors lived, and what the significance of these homes was. It occurred to me then that this was the perfect subject to introduce COG readers to my research, since houses were what originally brought me into the project of historical research. Continue reading

Back from the Courthouse: File No. 1292

At about 9:30 this morning, Andy, the one who was to drive me there, arrived and we set off for the Sunbury courthouse. After a fine drive, we came to Sunbury at about 10. The mom and I proceeded to the courthouse while Andy went off to walk about the park on the median, across from the courthouse building.

As usual, I didn’t have much time there. Think Andy said something about an appt. He is very busy; it was so kind of him to drive me there while my car was being such an old biddy. 🙂 Thanks Andy! Every minute spent there counts.

Continue reading

A glimpse of Shamokin at the end of the day

Just been out and about Shamokin, taking some photos of area landmarks and random scenes. Excuse the blurry photos; don’t know if it’s me or the camera or both, perhaps I should get a new one!

126 N. Shamokin

126 N. Shamokin Street: In 1930, this was the home of Sarah W. Kulp.

1609 W. Arch Street

1609 W. Arch Street: A fine old Edgewood home, this was the residence of Harry W. Shuman, nephew of Monroe Kulp.

The Douty Building

The Douty Building, Sunbury Street.

Upper view of the Douty Building

Upper view of the Douty Building

313 E. Sunbury

The brick, tree-shaded double, 313 and 315 E. Sunbury Street. According to the 1900 census, 313 (at left) was then the home of Monroe and Sarah W. Kulp.

The tracks along Shamokin Creek, from Water Street

The tracks along Shamokin Creek, from Water Street

A sunset view of Independence St., south from Washington St. Rear of post office is in foreground; far right, the American Legion building, which houses the library. The brick building is the Llwellyn Building--after David Llwellyn, I presume.

A sunset view of Independence St., south from Washington St. Rear of post office is in foreground; far right, the American Legion building, which houses the library. The brick building is the Llwellyn Building--after David Llwellyn, I presume.

This building, built October 1906, was once the carbarn for the Shamokin & Edgewood Electric Railway Company, and later the bus line's garage.

Arch Street: This building, built October 1906, was once the carbarn for the Shamokin & Edgewood Electric Railway Company, and later the bus line's garage.

Looking north from Walnut Street; built 1898 on land donated by Monroe H. Kulp.

Maine Fire & Hose Company: Looking north from Walnut Street; built 1898 on land donated by Monroe H. Kulp.

They are here!!

It was about 4:14 when I called the library about those ILLs; had called earlier and they said they would call me if anything came in today’s delivery, but that was two hours earlier and I wasn’t ready to accept the fact that it was another week…and nothing from Harrisburg.

So I called again, and what do I hear but–yes, the microfilm has arrived! They tried to call, but they called my other cell phone which I don’t use much anymore and which is on mute. (Didn’t I give them the new number a few weeks ago…? Well, whatever.)

I was out of this house by 4:40 and arriving at the library only a few minutes later. And there they were–two lovely boxes of microfilm tied together with a rubber band, and they were the right dates and newspapers too! 🙂 Everything perfect, no trouble with anything whatsoever! And the discoveries, the discoveries! So beautiful…and so sad.

Continue reading

Her hometown

Well, something has just come up and I will be making a trip to Dauphin County sometime later this month. It’s not research-related, and I won’t have a great deal of time while there, but the town of Halifax is on the way and I may be able to see the area, take photos. Halifax was the hometown of Sarah McConnell, who would later marry the city lawyer, William C. Detweiler, and, seven years after his death, Monroe H. Kulp. A small, rural town along the Susquehanna River, a few miles north of Harrisburg, Halifax was her home throughout the 1860’s and 70’s, where after her parents died she was raised by her grandparents, the devoutly Episcopalian John and Eliza/Elizabeth Marsh, who were innkeepers.

This will be an important trip for me; looks like there are a lot of important things are happening with my research lately! Great deal of progress being made. I am also looking into the possibility of finding cemetery records…a map of Halifax from the 1870’s says there was a cemetery in the area, but I am not finding any information about it online. However, the map is of a land ownership type and shows the property owned by John Marsh, so I know approximately where the homestead/inn was once located.

Although this won’t complete all of my research projects in Dauphin County, it will certainly be something to record here. Check in often for updates!

Called Red Cross

Called Red Cross today on my way back from more errands; got a hold of the director and she says they may have information. We arranged a date for me to come over there and look through their records. Turns out they are not the Mount Carmel but the Schuylkill chapter, phone book said otherwise but whatever, and they are in Pottsville.

Finally taking research to Harrisburg

Not in person, unfortunately. I may be able to make a trip to Harrisburg later in the year, but at the moment everything is remote. I emailed the Harrisburg library regarding look-ups or microfilm loans; hopefully a reply may come in tomorrow.

Now that I have two specific dates (see previous post), I will be able to get to the details of the Harrisburg connection. One of my primary objectives is to understand the background, personal and family history of not only M.H. Kulp himself, but most especially of his wife, Sarah W. (McConnell) Detweiler; and, of course, both her marriages. The question, finally, is: Who exactly was William Champlin Detweiler?