The Researcher Returns

Yep, I’ve been away a while. Several family matters came up which just couldn’t be avoided, and the past month has been so hectic I haven’t had time for anything but essentials. So, a lot of research plans were delayed, but now, I think I’m finally getting back on track. I have a lot to do, a lot to catch up on; yet, I think I’m ready for it!

Today, I wrote a draft of a letter to an important research contact and was able to get to the library to check some newspapers. The Harrisburg Telegraph has finally arrived! The original request was cancelled because they said they didn’t have the date I asked for…but I knew better. 🙂 After a few telephone calls, I was told that yes, they did have it and I was right, so just request it again then. I did, and it arrived last afternoon.

To recap, I requested the Telegraph looking for information related to the marriage and death of William C. Detweiler. I had looked up these events in the Harrisburg Patriot some time ago, but thought a different newspaper might report more info. Sure enough, I was able to locate some good leads.

First, it was mentioned in his obituary that he had attended the Harrisburg Academy. I’m not familiar with the establishment, but if I can find its records anywhere, that might be a useful source. Some internet searching is in order! Also, I now have a specific date for when he was admitted to the bar, which I may be able to look up in newspapers later on.

Some weeks ago I found an hour or so to visit the Odd Fellows Cemetery and take a few photographs; various members of families connected to the Kulps are buried there, including M.H. Kulp’s sister Sepora and her sons, Warren and Raymond. Since the cemetery is just outside of Trevorton, I stopped there as well and did more photography. I have hardly ever been there before, believe it or not, I don’t travel much; but it is such a lovely, quaint town. St. Patrick’s Church is there; I have an old photo of it, but can’t post here as my scanner is not hooked up. However, during my trip to Trevorton I took a photo of the church from approximately the same angle for comparison, and will post them here as soon as I have the older shot.

This photo was taken from inside the Trevorton post office, showing Shamokin Street.

This photo was taken from inside the Trevorton post office, showing Shamokin Street.

Interior of Trevorton post office. The postal clerk tells me the building was originally a general store, and the woodwork you see here is fairly recent, dating from the 1950s.

Interior of Trevorton post office. The postal clerk tells me the building was originally a general store, and the woodwork you see here is fairly recent, dating from the 1950s.

Other than that, not much has been going on in my research since late August. But, in any case, the researcher returns to business. As progress is made I will be posting here more often, so stay tuned! I’ll try not to disappear again. 🙂

Time to swat self again

Today, after having been busy for several days, mostly because of the holiday, I set out for the library again. (No ILL deliveries yet, I’m afraid.) I didn’t have much to do, but I thought I’d search out a death record for someone or other. However, the dates I was looking for weren’t there, so I instead took out the reel of microfilm for wills from the early 1900’s. I didn’t expect to find much, as my previous experience with the wills there had been that they are all administrations (no actual information about what was bequeathed to whom, just a basic overview written after the estate was settled). However, having nothing better to do, I decided to look for the administration for the estate of Elizabeth Gilbert Kulp, mother of Monroe H.; she died in 1902.

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Trevorton is off…reading newspapers this evening

Something came up, could not make the Trevorton trip today. It is a small cemetery I think, but I have left a phone message for the superintendent asking about plot plans, this will save time next I head to Trevorton.

This afternoon, I uploaded the family tree database to OneGreatFamily, a complex family tree site which supposedly has excellent auto-merging faculties, but I found the thing to be very difficult to use. Will have to get back to it later and see if I can do anything with it.

Also, I visited a website which contained databases of historical newspapers, books, and documents. I found there an article from the time of M.H. Kulp’s service in the U.S. Congress, which appeared in an Illinois paper, the Sunday Inter Ocean, February 8, 1896, and was entitled: “Oddities in Congress. Lawmakers Who Are Distinguished by Queer Manners and Careers.”

Monroe H. Kulp is a new man from Pennsylvania. He is known as Farmer Kulp, though exactly why is not apparent. He is a good deal of a swell in respect to dress. With reasonable certainty he may be said to be the cheekiest member in the House. During the last session of the Fify-Third [sic] Congress he had the privilege of the floor of the House, being a member-elect. It happened that a vote was pending on an important question, and, the decision being rather close, tellers were appointed. Under such circumstances the members all pass in line between the tellers in order that their votes may be recorded. Kulp coolly took his place in the line and voted, the cheat not being discovered.

Trevorton

In a few minutes I’m heading off to Trevorton Road, Coal Township (on the way to Trevorton, that’s west of here), where the Mountainview Manor/Odd Fellows cemetery is located. Sepora (Kulp) Thomas, the sister of M.H. Kulp, is buried there, and there are some details I’d like to clear up. Unfortunately, I don’t have a plot plan for the cemetery, so finding her grave may take some time.

I will post updates once I get back to a computer.